A Very Productive Weekend!

This weekend we pulled out all the fence posts from one fence row and built a new fence to expand the pasture for the sheep. That took all of Saturday and part of Sunday.

Here's the new fence and the happy sheep.

Here’s the new fence and the happy sheep.

Next I dug up four grape vines that were succumbing to overspray every spring from the field to our South. I moved them to our new “vineyard”, where they will hopefully be safe, along with the 6 new vines I planted. The varieties are Mars, Himrod, & Canadice.

Ten little grape vines, all in a row.

Ten little grape vines, all in a row.

Next I turned up the soil for our new raspberry patch. This will be just North of the Silkie chicken pen. They are Heritage variety red raspberries & the patch is a arch shape, at the center of which I hope to put a fountain someday.

All cozy in her new home!

All cozy in her new home!

Then I was plum worn out & decided to just wander around and enjoy the sights…

The asparagus is coming up nicely.

The asparagus is coming up nicely.

The kitchen salad garden is off to a very nice start.

The kitchen salad garden is off to a very nice start.

The ducklings are enjoying the sunshine on this beautiful day.

The ducklings are enjoying the sunshine on this beautiful day.

And now it's time for everyone to have a nap.

And now it’s time for everyone to have a nap.

Pilgrim Geese at Brown Fox Farm!

The Pilgrim goslings have finally arrived and I couldn’t be happier.  Well, I suppose I could be…  We ordered 8 goslings in February, but the day after they shipped (this Monday) we were called and told we would only get half our order because there were too many orders and not enough geese to go around.

So we only ended up with four.  Two geese & two ganders.  One of the geese was in bad shape all yesterday.  They were in transit for three days and I sped to the Post Office just after six yesterday morning when they called to let me know they’d arrived.  But three days is a very long time & it seems she was very dehydrated.  I spent the day and into the night making sure she took little drinks of warm molasses water.  She seems much improved this morning and is moving around with the other goslings & her eyes are less sunken & squinty.

Here is a photo of the babies taken shortly after their arrival…

Pilgrim Geese - A critically endangered American breed

The first goslings at Brown Fox Farm - Pilgrim geese are listed as a critically endangered American breed by the ALBC.

You can see the difference in the face of the dehydrated gosling standing behind the others.  After this photo she spent most of the rest of the day laying down.  I really hope we can pull her through.  Wish us luck!

Heirloom Seeds & Pancakes from Scratch

I want to thank all the people who visited our blog and signed up for our seed giveaway.  There were enough seeds to send some to ALL those who entered the drawing!  YAY!  I love being able to pass on good heritage garden varieties to gardeners who will put them to good use.  If you signed up, be sure to check your email & I’ll be getting your seeds in the mail right away.

On to pancakes!  I use to make pancakes with those boxed mixes – just add water.  Well, a few years back I found a recipe that seemed simple enough.  I tweeked it a little to get the texture & loft we like in our flapjacks and we haven’t ever looked back!  They are yummy and filling and just the thing to warm up a coooold spring morning.   I thought I’d pass on the recipe & give you the chance to try homemade pancakes for yourself.

1 1/4 c. milk
3 T. butter
1 Large egg (or 3-2 bantam eggs)
1 1/2 c. flour
4 t. baking powder
1 1. salt
1 T. sugar
cooking oil
(fresh blueberries or chocolate chips are a yummy option)

 

Warm milk & butter over low heat just until butter melts, remove from heat.  Whisk dry ingredients in a medium bowl.  Pour cooking oil onto griddle & begin preheating to 300-350 degrees.  Whisk egg(s) into milk mixture – temper egg if the milk is hotter than “pee warm”  Whisk liquid mixture into the dry ingredients.  Pour by 1/4 cupfuls onto griddle.  If adding chocolate chips or berries scatter over top surface of the pancake as soon as you pour batter on griddle. Flip pancakes when the rising bubbles burst & remain slightly open.  Serve hot with syrup and/or butter – or just eat plain from the griddle!

Hope you enjoy these as much as we do!

Free Seeds – Extras from my 2011 & 2010 Baker Creek Order.

If you are serious about gardening, or serious about propagating heirloom & open pollinated vegetable varieties, or all three, then this post is for YOU.

Over the last few years I focused on purchasing open pollinated seed for our gardens, primarily ordering from Baker Creek in Missouri (with a few seeds from Seed Savers & Johnny’s & potatoes & onions from Fed Co.).  The seeds I am currently offering to give away are all from Baker Creek.  I’ve been very VERY pleased with their seeds & service & I do want to make sure that if you plan on buying other seeds you’ll seriously consider visiting their site at http://rareseeds.com

Each year I tend to order more seeds than I need & this year is no exception.  So I would like to pass on those seeds we can not use.  If you are interested in receiving free seed please send me your name and your top 3-4 preferences from the list below.  On Friday (3/25) we will have a random drawing and winners will be contacted via email, each winner will receive two different varieties of seed from the list below.

(*= Currently sold out at Baker Creek **= A Seed Savers Exchange seed variety)

Here’s the list of seed:

Striped Roman Tomato, 25 seeds: Originally packaged for 2010, 80% germination in our test 3/21/11.

Fox Cherry Tomato*, 35 seeds: Originally packaged for 2010, 100% germination in our test 3/21/11.

Snowberry Tomato*, 30 seeds:  Originally packaged for 2010, 85% germination in our test 3/21/11.

Sungold Select II*, 55 seeds:  Originally packaged for 2010, 65% germination in our test 3/21/11.

Black Cherry Tomato*, 30 seeds:  Originally packaged for 2010, 100% germination in our test 3/21/11.

Royal Golden Watermelon*, 10 seeds:  Originally packaged for 2010, 100% germination in our test 3/21/11.

True Gold Sweet Corn*, 30 seeds:  Originally packaged for 2010, 70% germination in our test 3/21/11.

May Queen Lettuce, full packet:  Originally packaged for 2010, No germination test.

Connecticut Field Pumpkin, 7 seeds:  New seed packed for 2011, no germination test.

Mama Leone Tomato, 15 seeds:  New seed packed for 2011, no germination test.

Sugar Baby Watermelon, 15 seeds:  New seed packed for 2011, no germination test.

Traveler Jalapeño**, 25 seeds:  New seed packed for 2011, no germination test. (SSE seed)

Red Romaine Lettuce, full packet:  New seed packed for 2011, no germination test.

Royal Purple Pod Bean (a variety of green bean) 20 seeds: New seed packed for 2011, no germination test.

Good Luck & Happy Growing!

(*= Currently sold out at Baker Creek **= A Seed Savers Exchange seed variety)

Bellies & Bottoms

Just a note – if the Southern view of a North bound goat is offensive to you…  You might want to skip this post 😉

These are the photos I took 7 days ago of Magil & Pepper (Ramblers’ Peppermint Patty)…  according to witnessed activity they should be at day 131 and 150 respectively (though from the photos you’d think Magil was closer to kidding than Pepper).

It’s been a week since I took these photos & Pepper is getting a little udder & Magil is just getting HUGE.  I wonder if she’s cooking triplets.  I may try to get another photo today…  But Magil despises having her photo taken.  If you look close you can see my husband sitting next to her trying to keep her still on the stanchion – she was very angry about being shaved and was trying to push him off the side.

As of this moment there is no discharge from either doe and neither appears to be having any contractions.  At the time I took the photos I felt a lot of kid movement in Magil, and little baby kicks in Pepper.

Waiting is the hardest part!

How Does You Garden Grow….

Seed orders are complete! I have ordered from two companies which specialize in organic and heirloom vegetable varieties.

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds- www.rareseeds.com

Fedco Co-Op Garden Supplies- www.fedco.com

Both companies have a great following among folks interested in seed saving, heirloom vegetables, and NOT supporting companies like Monsanto which are establishing monopolies on seeds through gene patents. If you are planning to get elbow deep in developing your own sustainable garden plot these are a couple of great places to start!

This year’s garden will consist of a greater variety of vegetables than I’ve planted before.  I’m eager to try a few of the older varieties of corn, carrots and zucchini.  Last year we let some onion go to seed and saved it to start indoors.  We’ll see how well they do.

Next item on the list will be to gather a batch of eggs to incubate!